Tag Archives: Sesame

And Then There Was Sesame…

Are you kidding me 2019? That was the first thing I thought of when we were leaving the allergist’s office that Monday morning in January. Really… sesame…another allergy to add to the mix.

Like I wrote about in “Some Days Just Stink,”

we had just learned that …

  • TJ’s allergy levels for this year had pretty much remained the same unlike the previous few years.
  • That he would be going into kindergarten with dairy, egg and peanut allergies.
  • Then, Madison had unsuccessfully tried straight milk with her allergist the week before. This was her final step in being able to eat anything!!!

I felt blessed that soon I would have one child who could eat whatever I ate… could eat anything at parties or play dates or restaurants …. but then …

sesame struck …

 

_Embrace the storm before it ends and learn to dance in the rain, even if it tracks in some mud along the way. (11).png

Now, three times in the summer Madison had tried hummus and loved it. However, all three times her cheeks got a little red and irritated. The third time her mouth got itchy so we knew it was something to avoid and ask the allergist about.

In January, the skin test showed what we expected although we prayed and hoped for the opposite:

She had an allergy to sesame and needed to avoid it until next year when we could retest in skin and blood work.

Are you kidding me 2019? Another allergy added to the mix… and so I allowed myself the next day or two to be bummed and annoyed. But like anything, those 48 hours of sulking was enough. It was time to turn it around.

Sesame is the 9th most common allergy in the United States. However, it is one that is usually not labeled, since only the top 8 need to be. However, sesame can be sneaky.

(Sesame Allergy Post from 2015)

We are no strangers to s sense allergy as TJ once had it too. But since passing his sesame food challenge a couple years ago, he must keep it in his weekly diet 2-3 times a week. (The same protocol is used with all his past allergens.)

While TJ now loves hummus, Madison has her own favorite dip. Sesame free hummus is always an option (look for upcoming post) but also guacamole. We love organic Yucatan guacamole. But here is a simple recipe totally kid-friendly and adaptable to all taste buds.

Ingredients:

2 avocados (mashed)

1/2 of a lime (squeeze out the juice)

1 teaspoon cilentro

1/8 teaspoon cayenne

1/4 teaspoon salt to taste

1-2 tablespoons organic salsa of your choice (amount depends on how large the avocados are)

Directions:

  1. Mix the lime juice with the mashed avocado

  2. Add the rest of the ingredients

  3. For added flavor for adults, add some cayenne and cilantro to the top.

Easy enough to not leave too much of a mess behind and totally not miss sesame one bit.

 

TIPSy TUESDAYS – Always Read Labels – The Reality of Hidden Allergens – PART 2 (SESAME)

From food to non-food products, it is extremely crucial to be on the look out for hidden allergens. Reading food labels and learning about ingredients becomes second nature when living with food allergies.   However, even when you are comfortable with a product, it is important still double check the label especially since companies can change the makeup of their products. In addition, the ingredients in many everyday items will amaze you at times.   I know that I continue to be surprised by many of the components of common foods and non-food products.

Here is some of the information about SESAME that I have learned throughout the course of this journey so far. (It does NOT include every location of these allergens as we are still learning.)


1) SESAME ALLERGY

In the United States, sesame is one of the top 10 most common food allergies; however, currently only the top 8 are required by law to be listed on food labels.   Therefore, it is often trickier to manage. Those with a sesame allergy need to be aware of the other names for sesame.

Here are some of these other names for sesame: Anjonjoli, Til, Benne, Gingelly, Simsim, Teel

Also, with a sesame allergy, one must avoid all sesame seed and sesame oil products.  Sesame oil is usually not refined like many other oils.  Because sesame is a difficult allergy to manage, I have listed both the obvious and more hidden places where sesame seeds/oil may be found.

SESAME

Someone with a sesame allergy must avoid and understand the following words:

  • Sesame seed and sesame oil
  • Sesame Seeds = Sesamum indicum (The scientific name for sesame)
  • Sesame = Simsim (Name for sesame in East Africa)
  • Sesame salt = Gomasio
  • Sesame seed paste = Tahini
  • Halvah =sesame flour + honey; a Middle Eastern confection
  • Sesamol = component of sesame oil
  • Gingelly oil = another name for sesame oil
  • Hummus = spread or paste made from sesame seeds, chickpeas, olive oil, lemon, garlic (and other added ingredients based on variety)

Sesame may be hidden behind labeled ingredients of:

  • spices
  • natural flavors
  • seeds

Food items that sesame may sometimes be found in: (Very important to read every label and inquire when dining out.)

SESAME SUSHI

  • dips and spreads like chutney
  • falafel and related products
  • rices, noodles, stews, stir fry, risotto
  • sauces
  • processed meats, chicken, sausage, veggie burgers
  • breads, bagels, rolls, pastries,
  • bread crumbs, bread sticks
  • cereals and muesli
  • crackers, pita chips
  • cakes, granola bars, protein bars
  • candy and trail mix
  • appetizers (not just sesame chicken)
  • Asian cuisine (like sushi)
  • Middle Eastern cuisine (like halvah &tahini)
  • Gluten free products
  • And the list goes on…

Non-food items that may contain sesame oil:

  • lip gloss & products (Sometimes listed as sesamum indicum -sesame seed oil)
  • skin cream

Additional Sesame Seed/Oil Allergy Information

(Source: Allergy Experts US Website )

Sesame Allergy

(Source: Kids with Food Allergies Website)


Since I know I learned a lot by writing this post, I am confident that others will also find it informational so we smile on…


Disclaimer: This blog is a personal blog and used as a way of sharing and connecting with other readers. The posts, articles, and stories shared on the site are meant as a source of encouragement. In this challenging world of food allergies, I have found reaching out to other parents and people in my shoes to be extremely resourceful and inspiring. Therefore, I want to give back and do the same. The information on my blog is not intended as medical advice so as always, please consult with your doctor.


TIPSy TUESDAYS – Always Read Labels –