Tag Archives: Hidden Allergens

Nut Proteins in Olive Oil?

Because the only oil that we have safely added to my son’s diet is canola oil, we were looking to see if we could try olive oil despite his multiple food allergies.  After we briefly researched online, we came across articles stating that there may be nut proteins in some extra virgin olive oils.  We also emailed my son’s main allergist about this.   He responded back with one of the articles that we had already found and that I was planning on posting this week anyways.

Check it out and let me know your thoughts. 

Reality Check: Dr Oz on Nut Proteins in Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Source: Allergic Living


If you have nut allergies or are dealing with a family member with them, what type of oil and brands do you use? 

After reading, we must research more before any change is considered.  Instead of getting frustrated, we play detective and smile on…

TIPSy TUESDAYS – Always Read Labels – The Reality of Hidden Allergens – PART 2 (SESAME)

From food to non-food products, it is extremely crucial to be on the look out for hidden allergens. Reading food labels and learning about ingredients becomes second nature when living with food allergies.   However, even when you are comfortable with a product, it is important still double check the label especially since companies can change the makeup of their products. In addition, the ingredients in many everyday items will amaze you at times.   I know that I continue to be surprised by many of the components of common foods and non-food products.

Here is some of the information about SESAME that I have learned throughout the course of this journey so far. (It does NOT include every location of these allergens as we are still learning.)


1) SESAME ALLERGY

In the United States, sesame is one of the top 10 most common food allergies; however, currently only the top 8 are required by law to be listed on food labels.   Therefore, it is often trickier to manage. Those with a sesame allergy need to be aware of the other names for sesame.

Here are some of these other names for sesame: Anjonjoli, Til, Benne, Gingelly, Simsim, Teel

Also, with a sesame allergy, one must avoid all sesame seed and sesame oil products.  Sesame oil is usually not refined like many other oils.  Because sesame is a difficult allergy to manage, I have listed both the obvious and more hidden places where sesame seeds/oil may be found.

SESAME

Someone with a sesame allergy must avoid and understand the following words:

  • Sesame seed and sesame oil
  • Sesame Seeds = Sesamum indicum (The scientific name for sesame)
  • Sesame = Simsim (Name for sesame in East Africa)
  • Sesame salt = Gomasio
  • Sesame seed paste = Tahini
  • Halvah =sesame flour + honey; a Middle Eastern confection
  • Sesamol = component of sesame oil
  • Gingelly oil = another name for sesame oil
  • Hummus = spread or paste made from sesame seeds, chickpeas, olive oil, lemon, garlic (and other added ingredients based on variety)

Sesame may be hidden behind labeled ingredients of:

  • spices
  • natural flavors
  • seeds

Food items that sesame may sometimes be found in: (Very important to read every label and inquire when dining out.)

SESAME SUSHI

  • dips and spreads like chutney
  • falafel and related products
  • rices, noodles, stews, stir fry, risotto
  • sauces
  • processed meats, chicken, sausage, veggie burgers
  • breads, bagels, rolls, pastries,
  • bread crumbs, bread sticks
  • cereals and muesli
  • crackers, pita chips
  • cakes, granola bars, protein bars
  • candy and trail mix
  • appetizers (not just sesame chicken)
  • Asian cuisine (like sushi)
  • Middle Eastern cuisine (like halvah &tahini)
  • Gluten free products
  • And the list goes on…

Non-food items that may contain sesame oil:

  • lip gloss & products (Sometimes listed as sesamum indicum -sesame seed oil)
  • skin cream

Additional Sesame Seed/Oil Allergy Information

(Source: Allergy Experts US Website )

Sesame Allergy

(Source: Kids with Food Allergies Website)


Since I know I learned a lot by writing this post, I am confident that others will also find it informational so we smile on…


Disclaimer: This blog is a personal blog and used as a way of sharing and connecting with other readers. The posts, articles, and stories shared on the site are meant as a source of encouragement. In this challenging world of food allergies, I have found reaching out to other parents and people in my shoes to be extremely resourceful and inspiring. Therefore, I want to give back and do the same. The information on my blog is not intended as medical advice so as always, please consult with your doctor.


TIPSy TUESDAYS – Always Read Labels –


TIPSy TUESDAYS – Always Read Labels – The Reality of Hidden Allergens

From food to non-food products, it is extremely crucial to be on the look out for hidden allergens. Reading food labels and learning about ingredients becomes second nature when living with food allergies.   However, even when you are comfortable with a product, it is important still double check the label especially since companies can change the makeup of their products. In addition, the ingredients in many everyday items will amaze you at times.   I know that I continue to be surprised by many of the components of common foods and non-food products.

Here is some of the information about coconut, oats, dairy, and peanuts/nuts that I have learned throughout the course of this journey so far. (It does not include every location of these allergens as we are still learning.)


1) COCONUT/COCONUT DERIVED PRODUCTS are present in…

COCONUT 

  • many cakes, candies, chocolates, cookies, ice creams      
  • some Thai and Indian foods
  • some shampoos, soaps, lotions, sun products, and cosmetics

NOTE: Everyone’s body tolerates and reacts to foods differently.  For example,  TJ mildly vomited (spit up) the coconut milk that he drank at his last food challenge. Therefore, his body does not tolerate coconut milk and he is allergic to it.  However, the toddler soy formula that he has been drinking since June contains coconut oil which his body does tolerate.  In addition to this, Exederm, the shampoo/body wash we use for him contains Decyl Glucoside, an extract from coconut oil, glucose, and palm kernel oil. TJ’s body does wonderfully with this as well.  His body tolerates the oil but not the protein.

Coconut Allergy Resource 1

(Source: http://www.allergy.org.au/)

Coconut Allergy Resource 2 (Derived Ingredients)

(Source: http://coconutallergy.blogspot.com/)


2) OATS are present in…

OATS

  • many granola bars, cereals, cookies, puddings
  • oat based milks and creams
  • some moisturizers, face washes and scrubs
  • the Aveeno products that we had been using
  • some beers

Interesting article regarding foods with gluten and how oats are related to this

(Source: http://www.diabetes.org/?loc=logo)


3) MILK (DAIRY)/MILK DERIVATIVES are present in…

Aside from the obvious dairy foods like all of the varieties of cow’s milk, creamer, butter, creams, cheese and cheese products, yogurt, and ice cream, dairy crosses your path more than you think. Here are some other places that milk proteins and lactose exist…

COW

  • some baking mixes, baked goods, breads, cookies, crackers, granola bars
  • some cereals (For example:  Honey Bunches of Oats contains whey from milk.)
  • some chewing gums (http://www.recaldent.com/c_where_find_recal.asp) and some breath mints
  • some caramel and candies
  • some non-dairy creamers and lactose-free milks (This includes my favorite “non-dairy” creamer that contains sodium caseinate, a milk derivative.)
  • some soups, broths and gravies
  • imitation syrups
  • Lactose is used in some prescription and over-the-counter drugs and vitamins.
  • Casein is in some art supplies like some types of chalk. (Check out the article below.)

Chalk & Dairy Allergy

(Source: https://www.navanfoods.com/navanblog)


4) PEANUTS/TREE NUTS are present in…

  • Because I could not compile a better list myself, I wanted to share this amazing resource as we read and smile on to a great week…

Peanut Allergy Avoidance List & Travel-Size Cards

(Source: http://www.kidswithfoodallergies.org/)

peanut


  • Additional peanut/tree nut articles that I found interesting and informative.

Medications & Peanut/Tree Nut Allergies

(Source: http://www.peanutallergy.com/)


“Stupid Things That Contain Nuts”

(Source: https://itsahardnutlife.wordpress.com/)


TIPSy TUESDAYS – Always Read Labels –


Tbt- Dining Out with Food Allergies

Dining out with food allergies has to do with your own comfort level based on individual allergies plus being prepared. With that being said, it’s been over a year since we went out to eat with TJ, (minus one time after the beach when he was napping in his stroller with us.)We simply aren’t ready yet and feel as though he isn’t either being only 16 months and still having many food allergies.

Looking back to before we knew about his allergies, there were a few times we took him with us to eat. We always planned it for a time when he would be taking a late afternoon nap or right before his bedtime. While we would start each dining experience with him in his stroller, usually as we were eating our main course one of us would have to hold him as he started to fuss. Once again, we would continue eating our food while holding him. This is obviously no longer feasible since he is a toddler who is on the move and also has several confirmed allergies.   While we look forward to the day that we all do indeed eat out as a family, we are simply waiting for when it is safest for TJ.

However, just because we aren’t ready yet to hit up a restaurant with our little guy,  doesn’t mean we can’t prepare for when we are. Here are excellent resources that I have found and wanted to share.   We look forward to the days ahead when we will be using these resources too so we have faith and smile on…


Get prepared:

Managing Food Allergies – Dining Out

(Source: http://www.foodallergy.org/)


Test your knowledge: Take the Ingredient Quiz

Ingredient Quiz

Answer Key

(Source: http://www.foodallergy.org/)


This is an awesome guide to allergy-friendly restaurants throughout the United States. (There is also an app for your phone!)

Allergy Eats Website

“Nut Allergy & the Nail Salon”

Interesting article by Allergic Living about more “hidden” allergens. I always wondered about this too…

Nut Allergy & the Nail Salon