Tag Archives: Gluten Allergy

TIPSy TUESDAYS: Always Read Labels – PART 4 (WHEAT)

From food to non-food products, it is extremely crucial to be on the look out for hidden allergens. Reading food labels and learning about ingredients becomes second nature when living with food allergies.   However, even when you are comfortable with a product, it is important still double check the label especially since companies can change the makeup of their products. In addition, the ingredients in many everyday items will amaze you at times.   I know that I continue to be surprised by many of the components of common foods and non-food products.


Here is some of the information about WHEAT that I have learned throughout the course of this journey so far. (It does NOT include every location of these allergens as we are still learning.)

1) WHEAT ALLERGY

In the United States, wheat is one of the top 8 most common food allergies, most commonly found in children.  Many children outgrow this allergy by the age of 3 though. Like any allergy, it is important to once again read all labels, checking for any ingredients that may contain wheat.  According to the Food Allergen Labeling Consumer Protection Act (FALCPA), companies are required to label their products for the presence of wheat.  However,  there are some products that are not covered by these FDA allergen labeling laws and therefore, are exempt.

Some include:

  • Foods that are not regulated by the FDA
  • Prescription & over-the-counter drugs
  • Cosmetics, shampoo, mouthwash, toothpaste, shaving cream
  • Alcoholic beverages and tobacco products
  • Pet foods and supplies
  • Toys and crafts
  • And others….

For more information about product labeling, click here.

To read the complete law, click here.


WHEAT ALLERGY AVOIDANCE LIST & RESOURCE

The following link is an amazing resource for those with a wheat allergy.   The link contains a wheat allergy avoidance list and travel-size cards.  It also includes the hidden places where wheat can be found and some hidden names for it.

Wheat-Allergy-Avoidance-List-Hidden-Names

Source: http://www.kidswithfoodallergies.org


Even more information:

Wheat Allergy

Source: http://www.foodallergy.org/home


This third link contains food avoidance lists for the top 8 allergens.

Tips For Avoiding Your Allergen

Source: http://www.foodallergy.org/home


Wheat in My Soy Sauce?!?!?

Here is an example of just how important it is to read every single label.

Many sauces and dressings contain wheat. An example of this is the following soy sauce…

SOY SAUCE

“Contains soy and wheat”



Wheat in Art?!?!?

At times, allergens such as wheat can be found in art supplies.  This gives us even more reason to read labels and contact companies to check or double check when needed.   Play-Doh is just one example of this…

play doh 2

PLAY DOH

Allergy-free Play Dough

Source: http://www.aaaai.org/home.aspx

Allergy-friendly Art Supplies

Source: http://www.adventuresofaglutenfreemom.com/2011/08/gluten-and-allergen-free-art-supply-list/


Buckwheat

Despite its name, buckwheat is not related to wheat.   Since my son is allergic to many grains such as rye, barley, wheat, and oat, buckwheat was the first grain our allergist recommended adding to his diet. We used the following Bio Kinetics baby buckwheat cereal for many months.

buck wheat

More buckwheat information

Since we want to educate others on the world of food allergies and believe sharing is caring, we continue to smile on wheat free…at least for now…


Disclaimer: This blog is a personal blog and used as a way of sharing and connecting with other readers. The posts, articles, and stories shared on the site are meant as a source of encouragement. In this challenging world of food allergies, I have found reaching out to other parents and people in my shoes to be extremely resourceful and inspiring. Therefore, I want to give back and do the same. The information on my blog is not intended as medical advice so as always, please consult with your doctor.


TIPSy TUESDAYS – Always Read Labels –


How Does Epinephrine Turn Off an Allergic Reaction?

By now, most of us know that EpiPens and Auvi-Qs are both used to used to treat anaphylaxis, life-threatening allergic reactions.  However, who really knows how these life-saving injectors really work? I know that I did not so I found this article extremely informative.  Starting the weekend off a little smarter, we smile on.

Check it out ….

How Does Epinephrine Turn Off an Allergic Reaction

Source: http://allergicliving.com/

LOVE

Weekly Smiles (Events)

Here is a list of Smiling Away Allergies’ weekly events:

TIPSy Tuesdays

On Tuesdays, I plan to post tips that we have found helpful or something that we have learned during this journey so far. I call it “TIPS”y TUESDAYS not only because I must admit to being a bit corny at times, but mainly because I want to help others be prepared.  Therefore, once a week we will CHEERS to being prepared so we can smile on…


Worry-Free Wednesdays

Each Wednesday I will try to post a quote or lyrics to a song that I find inspirational.  Words that help me see past fear and worry, enabling us to continue to smile on…


Tbt (Throw Back Thursdays)

On some Thursdays, we will throw it back to some of the earlier signs and experiences with food allergies/eczema as well as what we have learned through it. Regardless of what should have or could have happened, we smile on together in trying to educate others about the world of allergies…


Favorite Finds Fridays

I plan to post a “favorite find” on Fridays.  It may not always be directly relate to food allergies and eczema.   However, it will always be something that has helped us a lot with TJ’s experience, allowing us all to smile on in faith…


SMILING ON...

(Source: http://www.firstcovers.com/userquotes/39076/let+your+smile.html)


Xanthan Gum

Interesting read about a common additive in some gluten-free baked goods. It is an ingredient in the allergen-free baking mix that I used to make TJ’s first birthday cupcake (that he didn’t end up eating anyways.) Wanted to share as we smile on…

Harmful or Harmless: Xanthan Gum

Favorite Finds Friday – Sam Mills Corn Pasta

When we met with a nutritionist about TJ’s restricted diet and low iron levels in May, there were several areas of nutrition that TJ was lacking in. We were instructed that between the ages of 1-3, toddlers like TJ should try to follow the tentative plan below for a balanced diet.

NUTRITION VALUES - FOOD ALLERGIES

DIRECT LINK TO DOCUMENT:

https://web.emmes.com/study/cofar/NUTRITIONALISSUES_FOODALLERGY.pdf

SOURCE:

http://www.cofargroup.org/


TJ was never lacking in the milk area, drinking breast milk for 13.5 months then switching to a toddler soy formula. Both of which he has always loved.

Milk or Milk Substitute Group   √


For the most part, his safe fruits and veggies that he was tested for have also never been a problem.  For now, we have taken more of a conservative approach to introducing foods, only giving TJ foods he has tested negative for through blood work. While blood work is not a 100% accurate way of determining whether or not someone is allergic to a specific food, so far with TJ it has been the safest way to go.

Fruit & Vegetable Group    √


Over the course of the summer, we were able to increase his meat intake, adding fat to that by using refined organic canola oil in his meatball mixture.  He also gets added fat through eating avocado almost every day which I have also heard helps to restore good bacteria in one’s gut.

Meat & Fat Group   √


This leaves us the group of grains. Having allergies to wheat, oats, barley, rye, eggs, dairy, sesame, nuts, peanuts, and coconut makes this extremely difficult.  TJ will also not eat the allergen free waffles and pancakes we have made for him nor will he eat regular rice. To add to that, TJ spit up the Rice Chex cereal we gave him months ago. (We will try again soon since he was younger then and had some issues with textures so it may have been more of a gag reflex.)

The only source of grains he would eat for months was Happy Baby puffs. Therefore, we would sneak grains into his jars of baby food from months 10- 16, adding organic buckwheat baby cereal or Earth’s Best infant rice cereal. But what I have already learned about babies and toddlers is that what works one month, week, day, or moment does not mean it will work the next. Nothing is set in stone. They like to keep us on our toes.

Now,  TJ is refusing those foods with ” hidden” grains, but I can’t blame him for that at all. He will still snack on puffs all day long; however, he needs more. Thankfully, Sam Mills’ Corn Pasta for Kids came to our rescue a couple months ago. Over the past couple of weeks, TJ has begun to really enjoy this product made by Sam Mills which definitely helps his lunches and dinners become more balanced. Heck, maybe we should try some for breakfast?!?

Grain Group   √(for now)

PASTA

While I know tomorrow this may change, right now I am grateful to have yet another safe product and great company for TJ so we eat and smile on…

IMG_4219

TIPSy TUESDAYS – Always Read Labels – The Reality of Hidden Allergens

From food to non-food products, it is extremely crucial to be on the look out for hidden allergens. Reading food labels and learning about ingredients becomes second nature when living with food allergies.   However, even when you are comfortable with a product, it is important still double check the label especially since companies can change the makeup of their products. In addition, the ingredients in many everyday items will amaze you at times.   I know that I continue to be surprised by many of the components of common foods and non-food products.

Here is some of the information about coconut, oats, dairy, and peanuts/nuts that I have learned throughout the course of this journey so far. (It does not include every location of these allergens as we are still learning.)


1) COCONUT/COCONUT DERIVED PRODUCTS are present in…

COCONUT 

  • many cakes, candies, chocolates, cookies, ice creams      
  • some Thai and Indian foods
  • some shampoos, soaps, lotions, sun products, and cosmetics

NOTE: Everyone’s body tolerates and reacts to foods differently.  For example,  TJ mildly vomited (spit up) the coconut milk that he drank at his last food challenge. Therefore, his body does not tolerate coconut milk and he is allergic to it.  However, the toddler soy formula that he has been drinking since June contains coconut oil which his body does tolerate.  In addition to this, Exederm, the shampoo/body wash we use for him contains Decyl Glucoside, an extract from coconut oil, glucose, and palm kernel oil. TJ’s body does wonderfully with this as well.  His body tolerates the oil but not the protein.

Coconut Allergy Resource 1

(Source: http://www.allergy.org.au/)

Coconut Allergy Resource 2 (Derived Ingredients)

(Source: http://coconutallergy.blogspot.com/)


2) OATS are present in…

OATS

  • many granola bars, cereals, cookies, puddings
  • oat based milks and creams
  • some moisturizers, face washes and scrubs
  • the Aveeno products that we had been using
  • some beers

Interesting article regarding foods with gluten and how oats are related to this

(Source: http://www.diabetes.org/?loc=logo)


3) MILK (DAIRY)/MILK DERIVATIVES are present in…

Aside from the obvious dairy foods like all of the varieties of cow’s milk, creamer, butter, creams, cheese and cheese products, yogurt, and ice cream, dairy crosses your path more than you think. Here are some other places that milk proteins and lactose exist…

COW

  • some baking mixes, baked goods, breads, cookies, crackers, granola bars
  • some cereals (For example:  Honey Bunches of Oats contains whey from milk.)
  • some chewing gums (http://www.recaldent.com/c_where_find_recal.asp) and some breath mints
  • some caramel and candies
  • some non-dairy creamers and lactose-free milks (This includes my favorite “non-dairy” creamer that contains sodium caseinate, a milk derivative.)
  • some soups, broths and gravies
  • imitation syrups
  • Lactose is used in some prescription and over-the-counter drugs and vitamins.
  • Casein is in some art supplies like some types of chalk. (Check out the article below.)

Chalk & Dairy Allergy

(Source: https://www.navanfoods.com/navanblog)


4) PEANUTS/TREE NUTS are present in…

  • Because I could not compile a better list myself, I wanted to share this amazing resource as we read and smile on to a great week…

Peanut Allergy Avoidance List & Travel-Size Cards

(Source: http://www.kidswithfoodallergies.org/)

peanut


  • Additional peanut/tree nut articles that I found interesting and informative.

Medications & Peanut/Tree Nut Allergies

(Source: http://www.peanutallergy.com/)


“Stupid Things That Contain Nuts”

(Source: https://itsahardnutlife.wordpress.com/)


TIPSy TUESDAYS – Always Read Labels –