Tag Archives: Food labels

What is Really in My Food?

Here is an interesting article about food additives that I stumbled upon.   Instead of becoming fearful of more foods, this article adds confirmation to the importance of understanding what is in our food.  Because it is Friday, we definitely smile on to the weekend…

An Eye-Opening Look at the Additives in Our Food

Source: http://www.npr.org/


Reading Food Labels

Throughout our journey with food allergies so far (especially at the beginning), one of the more confusing and frustrating parts was/is reading and understanding food labels.   These two articles discuss this topic…

You Asked: Can I Trust Allergy Warnings On Food Labels?

Source: http://time.com/


http://snacksafely.com/2015/07/time-article-can-i-trust-allergy-warnings-on-food-labels/

Source: http://snacksafely.com/


It’s almost Friday so we smile on…

tj cartoon

TIPSy TUESDAYS: Always Read Labels – PART 5 (BARLEY)

From food to non-food products, it is extremely crucial to be on the look out for hidden allergens. Reading food labels and learning about ingredients becomes second nature when living with food allergies.   However, even when you are comfortable with a product, it is important still double check the label especially since companies can change the makeup of their products. In addition, the ingredients in many everyday items will amaze you at times.   I know that I continue to be surprised by many of the components of common foods and non-food products.


Here is some of the information about BARLEY that I have learned throughout the course of this journey so far. (It does NOT include every location of these allergens as we are still learning.)

1) BARLEY ALLERGY

In the United States, barley is not one of the top 8 most common food allergies. While it is not as common as wheat, it does show up as an ingredient in several foods.

Like any allergy, it is important to once again read all labels, checking for any ingredients that may contain barley.  According to the Food Allergen Labeling Consumer Protection Act (FALCPA), companies are NOT required to label their products for the presence of barley.

For more information about product labeling, click here.

To read the complete law, click here.


BARLEY ALLERGY

From our experience so far, this is what we have learned about this particular allergy.  Please note, that this is not all of the locations that barely may be found.   READ ALL LABELS ALWAYS AND CONSULT WITH YOUR DOCTOR WHEN NEEDED. Also, it is important to contact companies when you have questions about their ingredients and labels.

Ingredients that can be derived from barely include:

  • malt or malt flavoring (We found this in some cereals when we were on the hunt for one that my son could and would eat.)
  • malt vinegar
  • brown rice syrup
  • caramel color
  • maltose

Food & drinks that may contain barley include:

  • baby food jars
  • beer
  • stews
  • soups
  • coffee substitutes
  • health foods such as breads
  • some cereals

I found the following link to be helpful regarding a barley allergy.   The link includes ingredients derived from barley as well as food made from it. Check it out:

Barley Allergy

Source: http://www.allergy-details.com/


Allergen Cross-reactivity Between Grains (especially Wheat & Barley)

Here is another interesting read about the issue of cross-reactivity.

Cross Reactivity Between Grains

Source: https://www.aaaai.org/home.aspx


Barley in My Bread

In searching for a bread that my son can eat, we noticed that bread contains various different allergens.  In fact, the bread that my husband and I eat contains wheat, soy, and barley. I did not eat this type of bread when on my breastfeeding elimination diet.

Check it out:

BREAD 2

Since we want to educate others on the world of food allergies and believe sharing is caring, we continue to smile …barley free for now…

TIPSy TUESDAYS – Always Read Labels –

TIPSy TUESDAYS: Always Read Labels – The Reality of Hidden Allergens – PART 3 (EGGS)

From food to non-food products, it is extremely crucial to be on the look out for hidden allergens. Reading food labels and learning about ingredients becomes second nature when living with food allergies.   However, even when you are comfortable with a product, it is important still double check the label especially since companies can change the makeup of their products. In addition, the ingredients in many everyday items will amaze you at times.   I know that I continue to be surprised by many of the components of common foods and non-food products.

Here is some of the information about EGGS that I have learned throughout the course of this journey so far. (It does NOT include every location of these allergens as we are still learning.)

EGGS 2


1) EGG ALLERGY

In the United States, egg is one of the top 8 most common food allergies and second most common allergies among children. Like any allergy, it is important to once again read all labels, checking for any ingredients that may contain eggs.  According to the Food Allergen Labeling Consumer Protection Act (FALCPA), companies are required to label their products for the presence of eggs.  However,  there are some products that are not covered by these FDA allergen labeling laws and therefore, are exempt.

Some include:

  • Foods that are not regulated by the FDA
  • Prescription & over-the-counter drugs
  • Cosmetics, shampoo, mouthwash, toothpaste, shaving cream
  • Alcoholic beverages and tobacco products
  • Pet foods and supplies
  • Toys and crafts
  • And others….

For more information about product labeling, click here.

To read the complete law, click here.


EGG ALLERGY AVOIDANCE LIST & RESOURCE

The following link is an amazing resource for those with an egg allergy.   The link contains an egg allergy avoidance list and travel-size cards.  It also includes the hidden names for eggs.

Egg-Allergy-Avoidance-List-Hidden-Names

Source: http://www.kidswithfoodallergies.org


This second link contains food avoidance lists for the top 8 allergens.

Tips For Avoiding Your Allergen

Source: http://www.foodallergy.org/home


Eggs and Vaccinations

Some vaccines contain egg protein. Read more about this here.   This is why TJ now gets some of his vaccines at his allergist’s office. For example, about a month ago, he received the MMR (measles-mumps-rubella) shot by a nurse at this office.   While I was so anxious about him having this vaccine and any potential reactions it may cause, he was safely administered it with no reactions, minus a slight eczema flare-up. Unfortunately, we will soon need to schedule to get his flu shot there too since daycare requires it by law. Since the egg-free version Flublok is only FDA approved for people 18 years of age or older, this is not an option.

Egg Allergy & the Flu Vaccine


Eggs in my Wine?!?!?

Here is an example of just how important it is to read every single label.

Last May, I was on the elimination diet of all of TJ’s allergies in order to continue breastfeeding.  One Friday night as I waited for my husband to get home from picking up food, I poured some wine. Just when I was about to have a sip, I noticed its label…

WINE BLOG

“This wine was produced with the aid of egg fining, and traces may remain.”

This just goes to show everyone who is dealing with food allergies to read every single label even when it seems irrational to do so!


Since we want to educate others on the world of food allergies and believe sharing is caring, we continue to smile on…


Disclaimer: This blog is a personal blog and used as a way of sharing and connecting with other readers. The posts, articles, and stories shared on the site are meant as a source of encouragement. In this challenging world of food allergies, I have found reaching out to other parents and people in my shoes to be extremely resourceful and inspiring. Therefore, I want to give back and do the same. The information on my blog is not intended as medical advice so as always, please consult with your doctor.

TIPSy TUESDAYS – Always Read Labels –